Mount Baldy

Posted by Derek on Nov 18, 2014

Mount Baldy as seen from Crossover Road

Mount Baldy as seen from Crossover Road

Height: 2014 feet / 614 meters
GPS recorded height: 2014 feet / 614 meters
Lat/Lon: N47 44.471 W84 18.407
Date Summited: August 14, 2014

Overview:

Located 44 km southeast of Wawa, Mount Baldy is a prominent hill which rises above the nearby Agawa River. The bare rock summit is crowned by an old fire tower. Unlike most peaks in Ontario, Mount Baldy provides unencumbered 360 degree views. It is a short bushwhack to the summit from nearby Crossover Road.

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Kwagama Hill

Posted by Derek on Oct 20, 2014

Kwagama Hill in the background

Kwagama Hill in the background

Rank: 17
Height: 2106 feet / 642 m
GPS recorded height: 2099 feet / 640 meters
Lat/Lon: N47 24.882/W84 33.535
Line Parent: Blackspruce Lake Peak
Key Col: N47 36.949 W84 31.633 (1115ft / 340m)
Clean Prominence: 991ft / 302m
Date Summited: August 13, 2014

Overview:

Kwagama Hill is a mountain 6 km due west of the popular Algoma tourist attraction, the Agawa Canyon, which is serviced by the Agawa Canyon Train Tour from Sault Ste Marie. Even though the area is fairly popular for backcountry excursions, there are very few trips up to Kwagama Hill. There was a fire tower on the summit of the peak, however it was knocked down in a heavy ice storm in 1965. The twisted metal remains are still visible today. The summit of Kwagama Hill affords outstanding views west to Lake Superior. Read the rest of this entry »


Silver Peak – Overland

Posted by Derek on May 25, 2014

Silver Peak Ridge

Silver Peak Ridge

Height: 1768 feet / 539 m
Lat/Lon: N46 06.662 W81 17.357
Date Summited: May 18, 2014

Overview:
Located in Killarney Provincial Park, Silver Peak is the pinnacle of the La Cloche Mountains, a weathered 3.5 billion year old mountain range that was once higher than today’s Rocky Mountains. The peak is so named because of the silvery gleam the white quartzite gives off in the sunshine. Although not the highest elevation in Ontario, the peak is well regarded for it’s mountainous terrain and sweeping views, and as such is a popular hiking destination.
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Kwagama Hill – Winter Ascent

Posted by Derek on Apr 9, 2014

Rank: 17
Height: 2106 feet / 642 m
Lat/Lon: N47 24.882 W84 33.535
Line Parent: Blackspruce Lake Peak
Key Col: N47 36.949 W84 31.633 (1115ft / 340m)
Clean Prominence: 991ft / 302m

Overview:
Kwagama Hill is a mountain 6 km due west of the popular Algoma tourist attraction: The Agawa Canyon, which is serviced by the Agawa Canyon Train Tour out of Sault Ste Marie. The area is fairly popular for backcountry excursions and because of this, there occasional trips up Kwagama Hill. There was a fire tower on the summit of the peak, however it was knocked down in a wind storm many years ago. The twisted metal remains are still visible today. The summit of Kwagama Hill affords outstanding views including west to Lake Superior.
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Sister Lake Peak

Posted by Derek on Oct 19, 2013

aka.: Peak 579 (no official name)
Height: 1900 feet / 579 meters
GPS recorded height: 1912 feet / 583 meters
Lat/Lon: N46 38.074 W82 34.898
Date Summited: October 12, 2013

Overview:
Sister Lake Peak (Unofficial name) is the highest point in the Rawhide / Mississagi Provincial Park area, a region north of Elliot Lake. The peak marks the highest point along a ridge formation which includes nearby peaks: Thunder Mountain and Mt. Belvedere. An Ontario MNR survey monument marks the highest point on the peak. Although the summit is open — atop exposed bedrock, there are no views at the summit. There are however, partial views on route to the peak.

Directions:
From the intersection with Hwy. 17 at Serpent River, take Hwy. 108 north to Elliot Lake for 27 km. Continue north along Hwy. 108 through Elliot Lake. At Quirke Mine Road, 42 km from Hwy 17, Hwy. 108 becomes Secondary Highway 639. Continue northward along the road for 17.4 km and pass through Mississagi Provincial Park. Just past the northern boundaries of Mississagi, you will arrive at Boland River Road. Turn right onto the well groomed sand and gravel road and follow it east for 18.1 km until reaching a turn off with a quad trail which heads north (left) from the road. Parking is best about 100 meters before the intersection (west) with the quad trail at the crest of a hill alongside the road.

The hike begins along a farily well traveled quad path which heads up the ridge from Boland River Road. Turn right (east) at each of the 2 3-way intersections on route (at 1.3 and 1.6 km respectively). The trail becomes more and more overgrown and eventually ends at 2.1 km. The remaining 600 meters must be bushwhacked, alternating between difficult tag alder bush and more open deciduous forest. The summit area is in a rocky clearing and the highest point is marked by an Ontario Natural Resources survey marker dated 1977. Read the rest of this entry »


Mt. Belvedere

Posted by Derek on Oct 18, 2013

Mt. Belvedere

Mt. Belvedere

Height: 1759 feet / 536 meters
GPS recorded height: 1774 feet / 541 meters
Lat/Lon: N46 38.799 W82 47.678
Date Summited: October 12, 2013

Overview:
Mt. Belvedere is a prominent hill in the Rawhide Conservation Reserve, north of Elliot Lake. It is a short hike (1.5 km) via the Cobre Lake Trail, to the open summit with its spectacular views of the lakes and hills in the area. Hikers have the option to hike the entire 12.8 km Cobre Lake loop trail through forests containing old growth red and white pines, picturesque blue lakes with sand beaches, and artifacts of the area’s mining days.

Directions:
From the intersection with Hwy. 17 at Serpent River, take Hwy. 108 north to Elliot Lake for 27 km. Continue north along Hwy. 108 through Elliot Lake. At Quirke Mine Road, 42 km from Hwy 17, Hwy. 108 becomes Secondary Highway 639. Continue northward along the road for 20 km and pass through Mississagi Provincial Park. The turnoff to the Cobre Lake Trail parking lot lies 62 km from the junction with Hwy 17, just as the road starts to descend into the Little White River valley. Turn right onto the short rough road and make your way east for 250 meters and then turn left at the 3 way intersection and head north for a further 250 meters to the parking area.
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The Crack

Posted by Derek on Aug 17, 2013

The Crack

The Crack

Height: 1165 feet / 355m
Lat/Lon: N46 03.681 W81 20.908
Date Summited: August 5, 2013

Overview:
The Crack is a stunning steep sided crevasse slicing through a quartzite rock cliff, located Killarney Provincial Park. The destination is popular with hikers for the iconic Killarney views of pristine lakes framed by the white quartzite La Cloche mountains. A recently opened access trail on Highway 637 allows day hikers a short, but rugged hike to top of the ridge.

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Blackspruce Lake Peak

Posted by Derek on Aug 17, 2013

Blackspruce Lake Peak

Blackspruce Lake Peak

Rank: 10
Height: 2146 feet / 654 m
GPS recorded height: 2148 feet / 655 meters
Lat/Lon: N47 37.012 W84 19.441
Line Parent: Ogidaki Mt
Key Col: N47 41.543 W84 01.056 (1411ft / 430m)
Clean Prominence: 735ft / 224m
Date Summited: August 8, 2013

Overview:
Blackspruce Lake Peak is a remote peak in the Algoma Wilderness, northeast of the Agawa Canyon. The mountain is the easternmost member of a group of peaks, which includes another 2100 footer; Parch Creek Peak East. Blackspruce Lake which gives the mountain it’s name, drains into Blackspruce Creek, which winds it’s way west into the Agawa River at the Algoma Central Railway.

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Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park High Point

Posted by Derek on Oct 1, 2012

Height: 1204 feet / 367 meters
GPS recorded height: 1220 feet / 372 meters
Lat/Lon: N44.87645 W78.86806
Date Summited: September 28, 2012

Overview:
From wikipedia:
The Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park is a provincial park in south-central Ontario, between Gravenhurst and Minden. The park is 33,505 hectares in size and is one of the largest and least developed natural areas south of Algonquin Park. The park has a low rolling topography which is characterized by numerous rock ridges, including scenic cliffs and gorges, separating dozens of small lakes, rivers and streams.

This vast area was once covered with forest and deeper soils prior to the logging era. Following logging, devastating forest fires swept through the area burning off the shallow organic soils leading to severe soil erosion and barren rock surfaces. Many lakes were filled, or partly filled with sediment, and have become marshes. For many years, this region was known as ‘The Burnt Lands’.

Directions:
Take Highway 35 North from the 401 for 110 km to Moore Falls. In Moore Falls, turn left onto Deep Bay Road for 6.4 km and then turn left onto Devil’s Lake Road and proceed to the parking and boat launch area. An access trail to the Ganaraska Trail (Wilderness Section) begins on Hull Lane just east of the parking area. The rugged trail winds it’s way over rough rock ridges, and traverses along ponds and beaver dams and for 5.6 km where it ends at Petticoat Junction.

Proceed north (right) at Petticoat Junction and continue along the main Ganaraska trail which follows a snowmobile / ATV trail. The trail forks at 1.2 km from Petticoat Junction; the Ganaraska trail branches south (left) here. Keep right at the fork and follow the snowmobile / ATV road north for 1 km to the Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park High Point. The highest point is located on the left side of the trail and is atop a small hill just a few meters north of a large rock with an embedded survey marker. A second survey marker lies 50 meters to the northeast. The summit area is thinly forested and affords good views to the east and west.
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Marne Peak

Posted by Derek on Aug 18, 2012

Marne Peak

 

Rank: 17
Height: 2106 feet / 642 m
GPS recorded height: 2135 feet / 651 meters
Lat/Lon: N46 57.374 W84 07.127
Line Parent: Ogidaki Mt
Key Col: N46 59.010 W84 01.024 (1640ft / 500m)
Clean Prominence: 466ft / 142m
Date Summited: August 3, 2012

Overview:
Located in the hills southwest of Ogidaki Mt., Marne Peak is the most southern 2100 footer peak in the Algoma Highlands. The peak has no official name and no significant nearby body of water so it has been named for the township in which it resides, Marne. The Algoma Central Railway passes within 8 km west of the peak at the Achigan and Ogidaki stations.

Directions::
From Sault Ste. Marie, take Highway 17 North and at the junction with Highway 556, turn East. Stay on 556 for 39 km and then turn left on Highway 532 north to Searchmont. Follow Highway 532 through the communities of Searchmont and Wabos for 14.3 km to the end of the road. Turn left onto the dirt road to Achigan Lake.

Stay on the main road to Achigan for 17.1 km where it joins up with the old Achigan road. (The old Achigan road is no longer a viable route from HW 532 as from this point back to HW 532 is no longer maintained, contains major washouts and crosses the ACR tracks illegally). Turn right at the intersection and proceed northwest towards Achigan Lake. At the 19.3 km, you pass by the old Achigan Station Section House which is now privately owned. At 21.3 km turn right as the the main road forks to the left. (The main road heads to the south end of Achigan Lake which is a access point for the boat access only camps on the lake.) The road beyond this turn is very rough and is not recommended for anything but high clearance 4×4 trucks and ATVs.

1.7 km beyond the south Achigan turnoff (23.2 km mark), the road to the north end of Achigan Lake forks to the left. Park just beyond this fork at a small clearing. The road beyond this point is rough and narrow and is only suitable for ATVs and dirt bikes.

Continue on foot or on bike along the ATV path for 1.5 km to where a beaver dam has flooded the entire area including the road. It is possible to avoid most of the flood zone by crossing along the top of the beaver dam. Beyond the beaver dam, continue north for 0.6 km to a hidden right turn onto an overgrown path. 1.8 km from the right turn, the ATV path ends at a creek and beaver pond. Cross the stream along the top of this much shorter beaver dam to a trail that is almost completely overgrown. If riding bikes, this is a good place to stash them.

The overgrown trail runs northeast, parallel to a small creek. After about 1.5 km from the beaver dam, the trail disappears entirely and the rest of the route to Marne Peak must be bushwhacked. It is recommended to continue bushwhacking northeast for 1.0 km until arriving at a large sloping rock outcrop. This is the site of an old logging chute which was used to flush logs down off the mountain.

From the old logging chute, head north and then northwest following the contours and then gradually ascending the notch towards the saddle between Marne Peak and it’s sub-peak to the south. As Marne is partially crowned by steep cliffs along it’s southwest side, head northwest along the base of the cliffs to where they taper off and the ascent is more gradual. Once reaching the top of the cliffs, head northeast towards the flat summit area. There are several candidate high points, however a small hill 70 meters south-southeast of the OBM spot point appears to be the highest. The summit is wooded and there are no views.

Note: It may be possible to access the peak from the north via a series of ATV / overgrown roads leading from Mile 38 Road and McDonald Creek Road, however this route has not been confirmed.
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